Daniel Zimnikov Supports Pussy Riot.

Pussy Riot is a Russian feminist punk-rock collective that stages politically provocative impromptu performances in Moscow, on subjects such as the status of women in Russia, and most recently against the election campaign of Prime Minister Putin for president of Russia.

Their usual costume is skimpy dresses and tights, even in bitterly cold weather, with their faces masked by brightly colored luchador inspired[citation needed] balaclavas, both while performing and giving interviews, for which they always use pseudonyms. The collective is made up of about 10 performers, and about 15 people who handle the technical work of shooting and editing their videos, which are posted to the Internet.[1][2] The group cites punk rock and Oi! bands Angelic Upstarts, Cockney Rejects, Sham 69, Era and The 4-Skins as its most important musical inspiration.[3][4]

The band also mentions American punk rock band Bikini Kill and the Riot grrrl movement of the 1990s as an inspiration in an interview by The St. Petersburg Times. “What we have in common is impudence, politically loaded lyrics, the importance of feminist discourse and a non-standard female image,” Pussy Riot said.[5]

According to Fifi, a Finnish online communist magazine, Pussy Riot also mentioned a number of other artistic and literature influences: Austrian artist Valie Export, culture jamming activist duo The Yes Men, Russian performance artist Alexander Brener, Russian Mi Movement (Wefree.ru), Mexican luchador Místico, Russian writer Vladimir Sorokin, French philosopher Michel Foucault, the composers John Cage and Pierre Boulez, American singer Nina Simone, French feminist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir, Canadian feminist Shulamith Firestone, Bulgarian-French philosopher Julia Kristeva, American post-structuralist Judith Butler, Australian feminist Elizabeth Grosz, Russian sexologist Igor Kon, Indian theorist Gayatri Spivak, American social activist bell hooks, American queer theorist Eve Sedgwick, American second-wave feminist Kate Millett, Italian-Australian theorist Rosi Braidotti, Elena Kovylina, Boryana Rossa, Lynda Benglis, Polish visual artist Artur Żmijewski, and Spanish artist Santiago Sierra

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s